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The intention of the Mindful Business Charter is to remove unnecessary sources of stress and promote better mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. We recognise that there will be times and transactions when long-hours and stress cannot be avoided, but this isn’t always the case, and we want it to become the exception rather than the rule. In this way, the Charter is brave and commercial. It recognises that we cannot remove all sources of stress, nor will change happen overnight – but as a business community we have a responsibility to try do things differently.

My Organisation's Commitment

  • Drive forward the actions and change necessary to support the Mindful Business Charter.
  • Promote a culture where people can speak up early about any concerns that they might have with their wellbeing (or the wellbeing of colleagues).
  • Make performance against the Mindful Business Charter / responsible business a priority standing agenda item for all client and supplier relationship review meetings.
  • Ensure responsible business is included as an area of assessment during significant procurement processes.
  • Once established, introduce the Mindful Business Charter to one new member every 12 months.

My Commitment

Openness & Respect

BUILDING TRUST AND EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION:

  • Discussing upfront with my colleagues, clients and contacts their preferred method of communication and clarifying any relevant implications of an individual’s working patterns.
  • Treating internal colleagues and external contacts with the appropriate level of respect and courtesy.
  • Asking for and providing feedback to others on a regular basis.

Smart meetings and emails

ADHERING TO SMART MEETING AND EMAIL GUIDANCE:

  • Allowing people to join meetings by the method they deem suitable, providing dial in details as default on meeting invites unless it is imperative that everyone attends in person.
  • Being respectful of others’ time by planning meetings properly (considering who needs to attend / giving appropriate notice / setting clear agendas and objectives) and avoiding last minute cancellations.
  • Avoiding over-use of email and not copying people into emails that they don’t need to receive.
  • Making use of subject lines in emails and ensuring these are reflective of the email’s content.

Respecting rest periods

CONSIDERATION GIVEN TO THE NEED TO ‘SWITCH OFF’:

  • Where support is required outside of someone’s core working hours, giving them options for when that could be (early morning or evening / weekend).
  • When sending emails outside of business hours, being clear in the title whether it needs to be read / actioned promptly or considering sending pre-timed emails (so emails are not received late at night and at weekends).
  • Including working hours / availability as part of my email signature, so people are aware of each others’ working patterns.
  • Respecting people’s right to take annual leave without the expectation of them checking emails / being on call, and role modelling the same behaviour myself where possible.

Mindful delegation

IMPLEMENTING A BEST PRACTICE APPROACH TO COLLABORATION, INSTRUCTION AND DELEGATION:

  • Respecting the need to provide sufficient context and information for a piece of work, ideally including the purpose and ultimate recipient.
  • When instructing on a task, negotiating rather than imposing a deadline, being transparent where possible on the wider timetable, and promptly communicating timing changes which impact others.
  • When being instructed on a task, being confident to flag when a deadline is unrealistic and / or unachievable.

be brave.

Download The Charter

Interested in finding out more? Get in touch with our team today.